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Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow Seminar Series

Calendar of events for the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow Seminar Series – Summer 2020

Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows collaborate with Princeton faculty and/or senior researchers within an energy or environment-related field to articulate an interdisciplinary research plan that is aligned with the mission of the Andlinger Center. Every week, starting on June 24, a Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow will hold a public seminar to talk about his/her research and to answer questions from the academic community and prospective postdocs.

Kian Wee Chen

June 24 at 2pmChen’s research focuses on the development and use of digital tools to support the integrative design process for the built environment. Recently, he has extended his research to include using low-cost sensors and IoT devices in prototyping building design with innovative cooling and heating systems. Chen plans to further his research through developing collaborative tools that enable timely access to data and models to support multidisciplinary research/design of the built environment.Website | [video_lightbox_youtube video_id="LTQk9Ew_M-s" width="720" height="405" anchor="Watch the video"]

Algorithm-assisted design: supporting integrative design in the built environment

June 24 at 2pm

Chen’s research focuses on the development and use of digital tools to support the integrative design process for the built environment. Recently, he has extended his research to include using low-cost sensors and IoT devices in prototyping building design with innovative cooling and heating systems. Chen plans to further his research through developing collaborative tools that enable timely access to data and models to support multidisciplinary research/design of the built environment.
Website | Watch the video

Tapomoy Bhattacharjee

July 1 at 2pmBhattacharjee's current research focuses on understanding and controlling the behavior of bacterial communities for water remediation. Bhattacharjee also collaborates with researchers in the Departments of Physics, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Molecular Biology, and at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. He also collaborates with researchers in bioremediation at the University of Virginia. Bhattacharjee published his most recent work from Princeton University in Nature Communications and Soft Matter. He is mentored by Prof. Sujit Datta in Chemical and Biological Engineering.Twitter | Website

Bacterial motility in porous media: implications for environmental bioremediation strategies

July 1 at 2pm

Bhattacharjee’s current research focuses on understanding and controlling the behavior of bacterial communities for water remediation. Bhattacharjee also collaborates with researchers in the Departments of Physics, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Molecular Biology, and at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. He also collaborates with researchers in bioremediation at the University of Virginia. Bhattacharjee published his most recent work from Princeton University in Nature Communications and Soft Matter. He is mentored by Prof. Sujit Datta in Chemical and Biological Engineering.
Twitter | Website

Luis Ceferino

July 8 at 4pm

Ceferino earned his doctoral degree in civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University where he studied the effects of large earthquakes on multiple urban systems including the power system. His thesis also focused on the policy implications for earthquake emergency planning and how to optimize the flow of patients, caregiving resources, and traffic during disaster responses.

At Princeton University, Ceferino works with Ning Lin, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering. Ceferino’s work leverages Lin’s expertise in hurricane and climate change modeling to model power systems during hurricanes, and provide solutions for more resilient infrastructure. Ceferino also works with researchers focusing on zero-carbon resources in the Andlinger Center.Twitter | Website | [video_lightbox_youtube video_id="QMETTR-Tofk" width="720" height="405" anchor="Watch the video"]

Disaster resilience of distributed energy resources to earthquakes and hurricanes

July 8 at 4pm

Ceferino earned his doctoral degree in civil and environmental engineering at Stanford University where he studied the effects of large earthquakes on multiple urban systems including the power system. His thesis also focused on the policy implications for earthquake emergency planning and how to optimize the flow of patients, caregiving resources, and traffic during disaster responses.

At Princeton University, Ceferino works with Ning Lin, associate professor of civil and environmental engineering. Ceferino’s work leverages Lin’s expertise in hurricane and climate change modeling to model power systems during hurricanes, and provide solutions for more resilient infrastructure. Ceferino also works with researchers focusing on zero-carbon resources in the Andlinger Center.
Twitter | Website | Watch the video

Rebecca Ciez

July 15 at 12pmRebecca Ciez is a former Andlinger Center Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow and, starting in the fall of 2020, a Postdoctoral Researcher at Columbia University and incoming Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Earth and Ecological Engineering at Purdue University. Ciez looks at the crucial transition of the electrification of transportation, specifically electric vehicle technology, and electricity generation technologies. On the former, she focuses on the interactions between electric vehicle technology and consumer adoption by developing a model of the state of used electric vehicles at their time of sale, and comparing this model with consumer willingness to pay for different vehicle attributes that would justify battery replacement between owners. For the latter, Ciez looks at design choices, operating methods, and how use requirements work together in solar energy generation and storage systems. Her talk is via the New Energy: Conversations with Early-Career Energy Researchers series at the Arthur L. Irving Institute for Energy & Society at Dartmouth.Twitter | Website | [video_lightbox_youtube video_id="YwqAdCl0pZI" width="720" height="405" anchor="Watch the video"]

Designing energy storage for climate goals

July 15 at 12pm

Rebecca Ciez is a former Andlinger Center Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellow and, starting in the fall of 2020, a Postdoctoral Researcher at Columbia University and incoming Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering and Earth and Ecological Engineering at Purdue University. Ciez looks at the crucial transition of the electrification of transportation, specifically electric vehicle technology, and electricity generation technologies. On the former, she focuses on the interactions between electric vehicle technology and consumer adoption by developing a model of the state of used electric vehicles at their time of sale, and comparing this model with consumer willingness to pay for different vehicle attributes that would justify battery replacement between owners. For the latter, Ciez looks at design choices, operating methods, and how use requirements work together in solar energy generation and storage systems. Her talk is via the New Energy: Conversations with Early-Career Energy Researchers series at the Arthur L. Irving Institute for Energy & Society at Dartmouth.
Twitter | Website | Watch the video

Bastien Wild

Dissolving silicates to build solid carbon budgets: insights from nanoscale investigations of minerals, glass, and cements interfaces

July 22 at 2pm

Wild focuses on the mechanisms underlying the alteration of silicate materials, including minerals, glasses, and cements. In particular, silicate alteration rates have important implications for the long-term carbon cycle, the durability of urban infrastructure, and the feasibility of several low-carbon energy technologies, including green cements, carbon capture and storage, and radioactive waste storage.
Website