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Spring 2020 ENE Course Offerings

courses

The Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment is pleased to announce
the following ENE courses for Spring 2020.

 

Designing Sustainable Systems: Understanding our Environment with the Internet of Things
Forrest Meggers

ENE 202/ARC 208/EGR 208/ENV 206

The course presents anthropogenic global changes and their impact on sustainable design. The course focuses on understanding the underlying principles from natural and applied sciences, and how new basic Internet of Things digital technology enables alternative system analysis and design. Material is presented in 2 parts: 1) Global Change and Environmental Impacts: studying our influences on basic natural systems and cycles and how we can evaluate them, and 2) Designing Sustainable Systems: synthesizing the environmental science with new IoT in an applied design project.


Engineering the Climate: Technical & Policy Challenges
Egemen Kolemen

ENE 308/MAE 308/GEO 308

This seminar focuses on the science, engineering, policy and ethics of climate engineering — the deliberate human intervention in the world climate in order to reduce global warming. Climate/ocean models and control theory are introduced. The technology, economics, and climate response for the most favorable climate engineering methods (carbon dioxide removal, solar radiation management) are reviewed. Policy and ethics challenges are discussed.


Rapid Switch: The Energy Transition Challenge to a Low-carbon Future
Eric Larson, Alicia Cooperman, Joe Lane, Vitor Vasconcelos

ENE 372/EGR 372/ENV 372

The 2015 Paris Accord signaled a global consensus that climate change is a major threat to ecosystems, livelihoods and the economy and that energy systems must change. Not well comprehended are the scale and pace of the needed transformation. Bottlenecks and constraints are inevitable with rapid, large-scale change. These must be anticipated and addressed to achieve climate goals — this is the essence of Rapid Switch analysis. Prospective regional and sectoral energy transitions are analyzed through multi-disciplinary lenses to identify bottlenecks and potential solutions and policies to maximize the pace of transition.


Introduction to the Electricity Sector-Engineering, Economics, and Regulation
Jesse Jenkins

ENE 422/MAE 422

This course provides an introduction to the electricity sector drawing on engineering, economics, and regulatory policy perspectives. It introduces the engineering principles behind various power generation technologies and transmission and distribution networks; the economics of electricity markets; and the regulation of electricity generation, transmission, distribution, and retail sales. Open challenges related to the growth of distributed energy resources, the transition to low-carbon electricity sources, and the role of the electricity sector in mitigating global climate change are also discussed.


Synchrotron and Neutron Techniques for Energy Materials
Claire White

ENE 506/MSE 586/MAE 536/CEE 506/CBE 566

Topics include an introduction to radiation generation at synchrotron and neutron facilities, elastic scattering techniques, inelastic scattering techniques, imaging and spectroscopy. Specific techniques include X-ray and neutron diffraction, small-angle scattering, inelastic neutron scattering, reflectometry, tomography, microscopy, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Emphasis is placed on data analysis and use of Fourier transforms to relate structure/dynamics to experiment data. Example materials covered include energy storage devices, sustainable concrete, CO2 storage, magnetic materials, mesostructured materials and nanoparticles.


Introduction to the Electricity Sector-Engineering, Economics, and Regulation
Jesse Jenkins

ENE 522/MAE 533

This course provides an introduction to the electricity sector drawing on engineering, economics, and regulatory policy perspectives. It introduces the engineering principles behind various power generation technologies and transmission and distribution networks; the economics of electricity markets; and the regulation of electricity generation, transmission, distribution, and retail sales. Open challenges related to the growth of distributed energy resources, the transition to low-carbon electricity sources, and the role of the electricity sector in mitigating global climate change are also discussed.


ENE Cross-listed courses for Spring 2020

 

The Science of Fission and Fusion Energy
Robert Goldston

AST 309/MAE 309/PHY 309/ENE 309

Power from the nucleus offers a low-carbon source of electricity. However, fission power also carries significant risks: nuclear proliferation (North Korea, Iran), major accidents (Chernobyl, Fukushima), and waste disposal (Yucca Mountain). Fusion carries fewer risks, but the timetable for its commercialization is uncertain. We will delve into the scientific underpinnings of these two energy sources, so you can assess them for yourselves. A benefit of this course is that you will expand your scientific and computational skills by applying them to important real-world problems.


Green and Catalytic Chemistry
Michele Sarazen

CBE 421/CHM 421/ENE 421

Concepts of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis applied to industrial processes associated with fuel refining and manufacturing of commodity chemicals and petrochemicals. Available routes for similar conversions using alternative, more sustainable feedstocks and processes will be discussed in the context of green chemistry and engineering principles. These case studies will serve as platforms to the fundamentals of heterogeneous acid and metal catalysis, including techniques of catalyst synthesis and characterization, as well as understanding of how reactions occur on surfaces.


Global Air Pollution
Mark A. Zondlo

CBE 311/CHM 311/GEO 311/ENE 311

Students will study the chemical and physical processes involved in the sources, transformation, transport, and sinks of air pollutants on local to global scales. Societal problems such as photochemical smog, particulate matter, greenhouse gases, and stratospheric ozone depletion will be investigated using fundamental concepts in chemistry, physics, and engineering. For the class project, students will select a trace gas species or family of gases and analyze recent field and remote sensing data based upon material covered in the course. Environments to be studied include very clean, remote portions of the globe to urban air quality.


Engineering Design for Sustainable Development
Catherine Peters

CEE 477/ENE 477

This course will focus on the sustainable design of urban water infrastructure. Students will use software packages and other design tools to design water/wastewater distribution and treatment systems, including new processes that incorporate energy and resource recovery. The projects are considered from concept development to detailed design with special considerations on sustainability and resilience.


Biology, Electrochemistry and Technology
Jason Ren

CEE 564/ENE 564

Interconnections between biology and electrochemistry are widely observed in nature and can be harnessed for engineering applications. This course explores fundamental mechanisms and related analytical tools used in microbial electron transfer, redox reactions, microbial corrosion and other processes. It also discusses interdisciplinary microbial/electrochemical technologies used in remote sensing, remediation, renewable energy, wastewater treatment, artificial photosynthesis, carbon valorization, etc. It trains students on interdisciplinary thinking/problem-solving skills and how to connect graduate research with career development.


Energy for a Greenhouse-Constrained World
Lamyaa El-Gabry

MAE 328/EGR 328/ENV 328/ENE 328

This course provides an overview of fundamental physical mechanisms behind sustainable energy technologies, including solar thermal, solar photovoltaic, wind, nuclear, and hydroelectricity. Physics of the greenhouse effect, projected Earth’s climate changes, as well as socio-economic impacts on energy uses and greenhouse-gas emissions are reviewed. Variability, dispatchability, and a real power density of energy resources are discussed. Energy efficiency, energy storage, as well as transmission and distribution of electric power are touched upon.


Energy Conversion and the Environment: Transportation Applications
Michael Mueller

MAE 427/ENE 427

Overview of energy utilization in and environmental impacts of propulsion systems for ground and air transportation. Roughly half of the course will be devoted to reciprocating engines for ground transportation, and the other half of the course will be devoted to gas turbine engines for air transportation. The course will focus on device efficiency/performance and emissions with future outlooks for improvements in these areas including alternative fuels and alternative device concepts. Relevant thermodynamics, chemistry, fluid mechanics, and combustion fundamentals will be reviewed or introduced and will permeate the course material.


Combustion
Chung K. Law

MAE 531/ENE 531

Chemical thermodynamics and kinetics, oxidation of hydrogen, hydrocarbons and alternate fuels, pollutant chemistry and control, transport phenomena, laminar premixed and nonpremixed flames, turbulent flames, ignition, extinction, and flammability phenomena, flame stabilization and blowoff, detonation and blast waves, droplet, spray and coal particle combustion, principles of engine operation.


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