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Summer 2018 Internship Opportunities

Research opportunities with faculty members on campus, as well as with non-profit organizations off campus, are listed below. Application instructions and a link to the Student Activities Funding Engine (SAFE) can be found here. The final deadline for submitting applications is March 9, 2018. Research must begin no later than June 25, 2018 and last at least eight weeks.

opportunities

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)

After the Audit: Improving Residential Energy Efficiency Assessment Reports
Home energy assessments are a key component of energy efficiency programs across the USA, but the results of these assessments can sometimes be difficult to understand or unpersuasive for homeowners. The assessments (sometimes called Audits) involve energy efficiency experts visiting a home, discussing the homeowners’ concerns and conducting diagnostic tests. Reports are then generated and delivered to homeowners explaining what should be upgraded and how much each upgrade might cost. Effective reports have the potential to increase investment in home upgrades and maximize the effectiveness of home energy assessment programs. Appropriate guidelines for creating reports should be developed, and the first step in doing so is to examine the reports that are currently being used.

This internship, based in Washington, DC, will involve systematically evaluating a sample of home energy assessment reports by applying theories of psychology and design. The intern will learn content analysis and coding procedures for reports, and may have the opportunity to also conduct surveys, interview participants, and analyze results (depending on availability of participants, timing of other components of the study and abilities of the intern). Experience, skills or knowledge in psychology, graphic design or energy efficiency are preferred, but not necessary. A keen interest in learning, a strong work ethic and an interest in the topic area required. As a part of the program, the intern will learn and strengthen their research skills. The study will be published by ACEEE in 2018 or 2019 to help home energy assessors create reports that are persuasive and result in more efficiency upgrades. The internship would begin June 4 and end on August 13.


Jose Avalos (CBE/ACEE)

The Avalos lab is offering summer internships in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology of microorganisms, including yeast, bacteria, and algae, for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. Several projects are available in the fields of metabolic engineering, assembling metabolic pathways for the biosynthesis of biofuels and chemicals. Some projects involve using cutting-edge tools in synthetic biology, including genetically encoded biosensors and optogenetics to monitor and control engineer metabolic pathways. Other projects involve protein engineering, including biochemical and/or biophysical characterization of metabolic enzymes. Finally, we offer opportunities in mitochondrial engineering to enhance metabolic pathways targeted to this organelle.


Andrew Bocarsly (CHM)

Design of Alloy Based Electrocatalysts for the Reduction of CO2 to Value Added Products
We recently discovered that certain metal alloys and intermetallics such as Ni3Al are catalytic for the reduction of CO2 to organic compounds containing carbon-carbon bonds (such as acetone and propanol). We have little understanding of the chemistry that leads to such products. To start to understand this chemistry, we will make a series of transition metal/Group 13 alloys and carry out electrochemical studies to determine which of these materials are catalytic for the reduction of CO2. To this end, we will need to learn how to make alloy based electrode surfaces, characterize the composition of these surfaces, and determine the types (and amounts) of products formed during the electrolysis of aqueous CO2.
Semiconductor Based Photoelectrochemistry
We are interested in developing new p-type semiconductor electrodes for the conversion of light (using an electrochemical cell) to electricity and “solar fuels”. Our primary solar fuel target is the splitting of water to form hydrogen. The semiconductors of interest are complex metal oxides (i.e. more than one type of metal is involved in the semiconductor structure). The proposed project will involve testing newly generated metal oxide materials as photocathodes for water splitting. The materials will need to be electrochemically characterized and their efficiency for hydrogen production determined. Some solid state synthesis may also be involved.


Emily Carter (MAE)

Materials design for high efficiency beyond-Si solar cells
To ensure a renewable energy based sustainable future, it is important to develop cheap, beyond-Si photovoltaic technologies that are made of abundant materials, easy to synthesize and retain high efficiencies. Although they are a promising beyond-Si technology, kesterite-Cu2ZnSnS4 (or CZTS)-based solar cells suffer from low open-circuit voltage and efficiency, which is often attributed to disorder induced by anti-site defects within the kesterite structure. A strategy to suppress disorder within CZTS is to dope Cu and/or Zn atoms with isovalent ions that have a larger ionic radii, which will inhibit the formation of anti-site defects within the structure. Indeed, experiments have reported improved efficiencies in CZTS cells with Ag (on Cu sites) and Cd (on Zn sites) doping. Notably, both Ag and Cd do not represent sustainable doping solutions owing to high costs and toxicity, respectively, reflecting an important need to explore alternate abundant, non-toxic elements as potential dopants. This project will use density functional theory calculations, under the guidance of Dean Emily A. Carter and Dr. Sai Gautam Gopalakrishnan, to screen for promising dopants which can suppress disorder and hence improve the efficiency OF CZTS solar cells.


Minjie Chen (ELE/ACEE) and Dan Steingart (MAE/ACEE)

A solar-powered mini cellphone tower with battery testing and advanced power delivery architecture. We are targeting setting up a mini cellphone tower on top of the Andlinger Center.

Development of high power wireless power transfer system for drones as a part of the mini cellphone tower. We are targeting delivering 50W of power over 50cm of distance.


Sujit Datta (CBE)

Nanoparticles are promising tools for sensing and potentially mobilizing trapped oil in underground reservoirs. However, as these are pumped through porous rocks, they clog many of the pores, and their transport becomes difficult to control. The goal of this project is to use 3D visualization of nanoparticle flow through porous media to understand which pores clog, why they clog, and how this impacts flow.
Polymer solutions are often used to recover trapped oil from underground reservoirs. However, it is still unclear how to design polymers that are both environmentally friendly and effective. The goal of this project is to use 3D visualization to see how polymers of different molecular structures mobilize (or not) oil trapped in a porous medium.


Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)

Clean Energy Intern – Vehicle Electrification (New York, NY)
The EDF New York Clean Energy team seeks a summer intern to support our “Beneficial Electrification” project, which will perform ground-breaking analysis to develop strategies to hasten electrification of energy end uses that involve the combustion of fossil fuels in New York in order to achieve deep decarbonization of New York’s economy. The Summer Intern will focus primarily on electric vehicles.
The Opportunity: With fossil fuel combustion accounting for nearly 80% of all greenhouse gas emissions, clean energy is a critical part of the race to reduce our nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. The state’s aggressive Clean Energy Standard has begun a process to ensure every greater reliance on renewable generation, a process similar to what has been embraced by many other states such as California and Illinois. However, with less than 20% of New York greenhouse gas emissions coming from electric generation, and electric generation already becoming less emissions-intensive over time, it is essential to ensure similar reductions in emissions from non-electric applications (the remaining 80% of GHG emissions) occur, though beneficial electrification or otherwise.

How to bring various non-electric energy end uses (including, without limitation transportation, building heating, and industrial processes) into the electric sector, such that their emissions can reduce automatically as the generation mix becomes ever cleaner, is a key challenge at this juncture. After many years of engagement in the electric sector modernization efforts underway in New York, EDF’s New York Clean Energy team is increasingly focused on the analytical, policy, and political challenges of making the environmental benefits of electric sector modernization available to the rest of the economy.

For almost a decade, New York has participated in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a northeastern regional scheme for capping carbon emissions of large electric generators. The RGGI scheme has been associated with emissions reductions, but at a pace insufficient to serve New York’s ambitious, economy-wide emissions reduction goals. In mid-2016, the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO), a federally-jurisdictional entity that oversees New York’s bulk power system, introduced the concept of carbon-based dispatch: a mechanism for incorporating a more complete carbon price signal in the wholesale market, which would allow non-emitting and low-emitting generators a competitive advantage over higher emitters, reducing or eliminating the need for direct subsidies to recognize their value. NYISO retained the services of the Brattle Group to consider the ramifications of such a mechanism. Subsequently, in August, Brattle released its analysis, which found that for reasons of emissions leakage to other states in the region as well as due to the substantial emissions occurring outside the electric sector, a mechanism reflecting the social cost of carbon in the wholesale electric markets would not by itself bring New York much closer to its ambitious carbon dioxide reduction goals.

Since there is no electric-sector carbon price that would create an incentive for electrification, and since high carbon prices in that sector alone would even create disincentives, New York needs to develop a coherent strategy for achieving the necessary decarbonization at a large scale, rapidly. The New York Clean Energy team seeks to contribute to this strategy development by providing analytic support, developing policy recommendations based on sound science and economics, and supporting the adoption of effective policy mechanisms where possible. Such a strategy could ultimately be adopted by other states and regions with similar goals and challenges.

Key Responsibilities – Tasks will include but are not limited to:
• The Summer Intern will report to the Clean Energy Director and will work closely with all members of the NY Clean Energy team.
• Evaluate opportunities for beneficial electrification through electric vehicles, with an emphasis on the following:
• Quantifying vehicular energy use and associated emissions in specific regions
• Emissions impact of full conversion from fossil fuels to electricity based on emissions of current electricity grid mix
• Additional renewable energy electric generation capacity necessary to power 100% conversion of transportation energy when converted from fossil fuels.
• Quantify vehicle efficiency improvements required to achieve GHG reductions of 30%, 50% and 80% respectively.
• Modeling marginal emissions rates to determine environmental impact of incremental EV growth in targeted states.
• Strategies for charging station deployment to maximize benefits of electric vehicle integration while minimizing costs
• Draft and finalize a report relative to the findings of this project and provide a briefing to the leadership team of the Clean Energy program regarding the report and various findings and recommendations.

Qualifications: Demonstrated interest in and ability to conduct independent research with limited direction; Strong verbal and written communication skills; Superior skills in MS Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint; An understanding of and commitment to Environmental Defense Fund’s mission of protecting the natural environment and limiting humankind’s impact on the planet; Must be well organized, motivated, and detail-oriented; Ability to multi-task, prioritize and meet deadlines; Ability to work in a team setting and have the ability to work independently when projects are due; Demonstrate initiative and problem solving skills.
Term 10 weeks during the summer, Hours Full-time (35 hours/week)
Application Materials: Interested applicants should attach their cover letter and resume to the EDF application, together with a writing sample. Writing sample should be no longer than 5 pages.


Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)

Clean Energy Intern – Building Electrification (New York, NY)
The EDF New York Clean Energy team seeks a summer intern to support our “Beneficial Electrification” project, which will perform ground-breaking analysis to develop strategies to hasten electrification of energy end uses that involve the combustion of fossil fuels in New York in order to achieve deep decarbonization of New York’s economy. The Summer Intern will focus primarily on building electrification.
The Opportunity: With fossil fuel combustion accounting for nearly 80% of all greenhouse gas emissions, clean energy is a critical part of the race to reduce our nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. The state’s aggressive Clean Energy Standard has begun a process to ensure every greater reliance on renewable generation, a process similar to what has been embraced by many other states such as California and Illinois. However, with less than 20% of New York greenhouse gas emissions coming from electric generation, and electric generation already becoming less emissions-intensive over time, it is essential to ensure similar reductions in emissions from non-electric applications (the remaining 80% of GHG emissions) occur, though beneficial electrification or otherwise.

How to bring various non-electric energy end uses (including, without limitation transportation, building heating, and industrial processes) into the electric sector, such that their emissions can reduce automatically as the generation mix becomes ever cleaner, is a key challenge at this juncture. After many years of engagement in the electric sector modernization efforts underway in New York, EDF’s New York Clean Energy team is increasingly focused on the analytical, policy, and political challenges of making the environmental benefits of electric sector modernization available to the rest of the economy.

For almost a decade, New York has participated in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), a northeastern regional scheme for capping carbon emissions of large electric generators. The RGGI scheme has been associated with emissions reductions, but at a pace insufficient to serve New York’s ambitious, economy-wide emissions reduction goals. In mid-2016, the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO), a federally-jurisdictional entity that oversees New York’s bulk power system, introduced the concept of carbon-based dispatch: a mechanism for incorporating a more complete carbon price signal in the wholesale market, which would allow non-emitting and low-emitting generators a competitive advantage over higher emitters, reducing or eliminating the need for direct subsidies to recognize their value. NYISO retained the services of the Brattle Group to consider the ramifications of such a mechanism. Subsequently, in August, Brattle released its analysis, which found that for reasons of emissions leakage to other states in the region as well as due to the substantial emissions occurring outside the electric sector, a mechanism reflecting the social cost of carbon in the wholesale electric markets would not by itself bring New York much closer to its ambitious carbon dioxide reduction goals.

Since there is no electric-sector carbon price that would create an incentive for electrification, and since high carbon prices in that sector alone would even create disincentives, New York needs to develop a coherent strategy for achieving the necessary decarbonization at a large scale, rapidly. The New York Clean Energy team seeks to contribute to this strategy development by providing analytic support, developing policy recommendations based on sound science and economics, and supporting the adoption of effective policy mechanisms where possible. Such a strategy could ultimately be adopted by other states and regions with similar goals and challenges.

Key Responsibilities: Tasks will include but are not limited to:
• The Summer Intern will report to the Clean Energy Director and will work closely with all members of the NY Clean Energy team.
• Evaluate opportunities for beneficial electrification in buildings, with an emphasis on the following:
• Quantifying building energy use and associated emissions by fuel type in specific regions.
• Emissions impact of full conversion from fossil fuels to electricity based on emissions of current electricity grid mix
• Additional renewable energy electric generation capacity necessary to power 100% of building energy use converted from fossil fuels.
• Quantify building efficiency improvements required to achieve GHG reductions of 30%, 50% and 80% respectively.
• Estimate costs associated with various approaches.
• Identify practical opportunities for converting traditional fossil fuel use in buildings to electricity.
• Rate design opportunities for enhancing beneficial electrification in buildings
• Draft and finalize a report relative to the findings of this project and provide a briefing to the leadership team of the Clean Energy program regarding the report and various findings and recommendations.

Qualifications: Demonstrated interest in and ability to conduct independent research with limited direction; Strong verbal and written communication skills; Superior skills in MS Word, Excel, Access, PowerPoint; An understanding of and commitment to Environmental Defense Fund’s mission of protecting the natural environment and limiting humankind’s impact on the planet; Must be well organized, motivated, and detail-oriented; Ability to multi-task, prioritize and meet deadlines; Ability to work in a team setting and have the ability to work independently when projects are due; Demonstrate initiative and problem solving skills.
Term 10 weeks during the summer, Hours Full-time (35 hours/week)
Application Materials: Interested applicants should attach their cover letter and resume to the EDF application, together with a writing sample. Writing sample should be no longer than 5 pages.


Environmental Defense Fund (EDF)

Clean Energy Intern – EDF Office (Chicago, IL)
Description: Under supervision of the Midwest Director for Clean Energy, the PEI Intern will work closely with economists, lawyers, media and program staff across the organization to advance EDF Clean Energy goals in Illinois and the Midwest. Overall, the PEI Intern will focus on legislative and regulatory barriers to clean energy, with a focus on analyzing newly available energy-usage data in order to develop more effective policies and rate structures. This engagement will help EDF advance two policy issues. First, the intern will help evaluate the monthly savings or bill increases Illinois customers would see from a suite of dynamic energy pricing regimes, including theoretical Time-of-Use (TOU) rates and ComEd’s current Residential Real-Time Pricing (RRTP) program. Second, the intern will help evaluate alternative EV rate designs in order to expand clean-energy electrification and explore the potential for vehicle-to-grid grid services.

Responsibilities: EDF seeks to use this energy-usage information to empower stakeholders, including entrepreneurs, utilities and consumers, to create and employ new energy services that lead to greater efficiency, lower costs, healthier air and less pollution. Specifically, the intern will work in Chicago with EDF’s Big Energy Data team to: Conduct analysis to answer key consumer questions using real data; build public-facing tools on pricing, rate design, renewable energy and other issues to allow researchers and the public to interact with the data to explore the effects of changing variables; identify policies that encourage consumers to make efficient and clean energy choices; publicize results through reports, articles, conference presentations, advocacy and targeted outreach; incorporate research findings into advocacy to support climate goals; and prompt private-sector firms to utilize the data to identify clean energy opportunities. Adviser: Dick Munson, Environmental Defense Fund
Term 10 weeks during the summer (with some flexibility on start/end dates and duration), Hours Full-time (35 hours/week)


Yiguang Ju (MAE) and Minjie Chen (ELE/ACEE)

Development of a resonant cascading ignition system for lean burn compression ignition engines
The goal of this proposed work is to develop a new volumetric resonant cascading ignition technique to achieve efficient ignition for the next generation lean burn compression ignition gasoline engines, which can have up to 30% efficiency improvement of today’s gasoline engines. The students will be jointly advised by Prof. Yiguang Ju in MAE and Prof. Minjie Chen in EE to develop and test this new ignition system together with a graduate student.


Egemen Kolemen (MAE/ACEE)

Liquid metal flow control using electromagnetic fields (hands on work or simulation work)
Liquid metals are used in a variety of ways to enhance both energy production and energy storage. We have a testbed to understand how to control these flows. The student would run experiments or simulations to better understand these flows and optimize/control them.

Machine learning approach to understanding the underlying principles of fusion reactions to optimize
Fusion is a complicated phenomena that is hard to simulate with current approaches. We are developing machine learning techniques to use the immense amounts of data that is gathered in experimental fusion reactors to make models. The aim is then to optimize these reactions. The student working on this project will learn machine learning tools and apply them to large fusion data sets.


Lynn Loo (CBE)

Hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOIPs) are promising materials for solar energy harvesting. Recent work has highlighted how solvent chemistry in the HOIP precursor solution may be leveraged to control the formation of HOIP active layers for application in solar cells.1 Using UV-vis spectroscopy, this project entails measuring and quantifying the strength of interactions between HOIP precursors and various processing solvents to investigate how the application of hard/soft acid/base (HSAB) principles can allow us refine our control over the crystallization of HOIP active layers. Applicants should have previous chemistry laboratory experience.


Forrest Meggers (ARC/ACEE)

Novel heating and cooling materials and mechanisms
We are investigating systematic ways to manipulate the heat transfer and comfort in buildings. One uses novel materials to dehumidify air for comfort. The other considers ways that surface blackbody radiation (½ of heat transfer to occupants and thus responsible for ½ or comfort) can be controlled more effectively. The work will involve both experimental prototypes, and simulation of energy and comfort performance.

Machine learning human comfort and presence
We have developed a new sensor that collects data on human occupancy in space and on surface temperatures of people and surfaces in space. We are collecting large datasets and are working to use machine learning to develop a robust method for accurate occupancy and thermal comfort detections. The work would setup and verify different criteria and training set performance to eventually be deployed in a new building control system.


Barry Rand (ELE/ACEE)

A main decomposition pathway for metal halide perovskites, a promising photovoltaic material, is photolysis or thermolysis of volatile halogen containing gases (I2, Br2, HI, etc.). We would like to know which materials are ideal encapsulants to keep these gases sealed in with the ultimate goal of improving the long term stability of these solar cells.


Barry Rand (ELE/ACEE) and Minjie Chen (ELE/ACEE)

Thin film solar modules with integrated power management
It is important to identify solutions for solar to electric energy conversion for those applications where partial shading is common, such as mobile applications. This research explores how to integrate passive components (such as coils) together with active energy materials, such as solar cells and batteries, with the aim to save cost and miniaturize size.


Greg Scholes (CHM)

The Scholes group studies light-powered chemistry and biology using both ultrafast laser experiments and theoretical modelling. Summer projects include studies of how photoexcitations in organic crystals can “split” to generate an entangled pair of triplet excitations—a phenomenon called singlet fission.


Ronnie Sircar (ORFE)

Energy Production Finance & Economics
The dramatic decline in oil prices, from around $110 per barrel in June 2014 to less than $50 through most of 2017 highlights the importance of competition between different energy sources. Indeed, the price drop has been primarily attributed to OPEC’s strategic decision not to curb its oil production in the face of increased supply of shale gas and oil in the US, which itself arises from the innovation of fracking technology. This follows similar declines in natural gas prices that led to a reduction in coal use for electricity production and an unexpected resulting decline in carbon emissions in the US. Many questions arise. How long is this sustainable? What are the economics behind it? How does increasing supply of fossil fuels impact investment in renewable energy R&D? What are the consequences for consumers, the environment and energy security.

The project involves analysis of energy prices data and game theoretic models of commodity markets. Some references are:
http://www.princeton.edu/~sircar/Public/ARTICLES/cournotSurvey_020315.pdf
http://www.princeton.edu/~sircar/Public/ARTICLES/varcosts101614.pdf
http://www.princeton.edu/~sircar/Public/ARTICLES/opec071715.pdf
http://www.princeton.edu/~sircar/Public/ARTICLES/Stochastic_Demand_092617.pdf


Howard Stone (MAE)

Electrochemical capacitors are energy storage devices that are used for applications involving rapid charging / discharging. Recently, a special type of electrochemical capacitors are gaining interest that involve flowable electrodes. In this project, the student will perform experiments and modeling of these new type of capacitors.


Elke Weber (PSY/ACEE)

Behavioral Science for Policy Lab (BSPL)
The Behavioral Science for Policy Lab (BSPL), directed by Professor Elke Weber, is located at the intersection of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the Woodrow Wilson School for Public Policy, and the Psychology Department. As an interdisciplinary lab, BSPL brings together researchers with varied backgrounds in order to shed light on the psychological foundations of real world decisions, with a focus on issues related to energy and the environment. This might include decisions made by engineers, policy makers, climate change negotiators, and members of the general public. Our methods range from process-tracing in controlled lab and virtual-lab experiments to field experiments in real-world settings to using big data, and include both quantitative modeling and qualitative approaches. The research is founded on the idea that psychological theory needs to interface with other social sciences, physical and biological sciences and engineering to effectively address large-scale societal problems, such as climate change.

This internship will provide you with the opportunity to participate in ongoing research projects in the lab for a period of 8 weeks, starting in mid to late May, depending on your availability. You will be working with BSPL graduate students and postdocs and help with the design of web-based surveys and experiments that examine barriers to better decision making related to energy or the environment or that design and test interventions to circumvent or overcome such cognitive or motivational barriers. Depending on your skills and interests, you will also gain expertise in collecting, cleaning, coding and analyzing such data or conducting literature reviews on relevant questions of interest. Some exposure and training in behavioral science research is preferred but not necessary.


Claire White (CEE/ACEE)

Optimizing the High Temperature Performance of Fly Ash Aluminosilicate Concrete
Conventional cement-based materials exposed to high temperatures (e.g., building fires) degrade significantly requiring immediate replacement. Furthermore, conventional cement-based concrete is responsible for 5-8% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. This research project centers on understanding and optimizing the temperature resistance of low-CO2 cementitious composites for elevated temperature applications, such as fire walls and refractory materials. The undergraduate project will include sample synthesis and heat treatment in the lab followed by mechanical characterization (compressive/flexural strength) and elucidation of the impact of temperature on the material’s pore structure.



Eric Larson
, Tom Kreutz (ESAG)

ACEE’s Energy System’s Analysis Group (ESAG) is embarking on a multi-year research effort studying the prospective deep decarbonization of the U.S. electricity sector, whose goals are to learn: 1) which advanced low- and negative-carbon electricity generation and storage technologies are likely to play a key role in a low carbon future for the U.S., and 2) what public policies and changes in the design and regulation of wholesale power markets might be required to achieve deep decarbonization. The intern will master the state-of-the-art, high resolution, commercial grid simulation program, Aurora, running on a dedicated multi-core workstation (for parallelized optimization), and will explore the future evolution of the grid over the next three decades, investigating both prospective opportunities and possible hurdles to deep decarbonization by mid-century.


Nan Yao (PRISM), Sankaran Sundaresan (CBE)

Emerging rhizosphere: 3D in-situ imaging of the evolution of porous architecture at the root-soil interface
Soil is one of the greatest scientific frontiers and the rhizosphere is the most active portion of soil. The rhizosphere is the zone of soil immediately adjacent to the plant root which regulates many key plant processes and interactions including water uptake, nutrient acquisition, gaseous exchange, synthesis of growth regulators and storage of carbohydrates. Therefore, the rhizosphere is critical for plant health and nutrient acquisition in which biogeochemical processes influence a host of landscape and global scale processes. A better understanding of these processes is very important for maintaining the health of the planet and feeding the organisms that live on it. However, it has been very challenging in studying distinct and unique differences with soil from the root-soil interface, including root-soil structure, hydraulic properties and mechanical stability. In this project, we will study the temporal changes to the intact rhizosphere pore structure during the emergence of a developing plant root system in different environment. A new non-distractive technique of high-resolution 3D X-ray computed tomography (CT) will be used to in-situ quantify the impact of root development on soil structural evolution, at scales relevant to individual micro-pores and aggregates.



Application instructions:

1. Applications must be submitted via SAFE.

  • Funding Office: ACEE
  • Activity Type: Undergraduate Internships
  • Opportunity Name: Undergraduate Summer Internships in Energy and the Environment

2. For on-campus internships chosen from the list of available projects, include with the application: a copy of your transcript, a detailed budget of anticipated research materials (this requires speaking with the faculty member whose project you are applying for), and a copy of your resume/CV.

3. For self-initiated, on-campus internships, include with the application: a project description of no more than two pages, a detailed budget of anticipated research materials (this requires speaking with the faculty member whose project you are applying for), a copy of your transcript, and a copy of your resume/CV.

4. For off-campus internships with outside organizations, include with the application: a copy of your transcript, a detailed budget for travel expenses, and a copy of your resume/CV. Applications for internships with outside organizations will be reviewed by the host organization in addition to Princeton faculty and program coordinators in order to determine the most suitable candidates for each position. The host organization may contact the student to arrange a telephone or in-person interview. **Please carefully review the application requirements–some of the off campus opportunities require a writing sample and cover letter.

5. Be sure to check that your application is submitted and locked before the March 9, 2018 final deadline. Incomplete and/or draft applications will not be considered.

If you have questions about the application process, please contact Moira Selinka, ACEE Education Coordinator, at mselinka@princeton.edu or 8-8456.